Passenger Check List

Make sure you have everything ready for your trip!

What Documentation Do You Need To Travel?

As a traveler, you are responsible for finding out about the appropriate travel documents required for your trip: a passport or the appropriate government-issued photo identification, visa, permits, medical insurance, vaccination certificates, proof of immunization, etc.

 

NOTE: You must ensure the expiration date of your passport is more than six months after you plan to return to the U.S. as some countries will not admit someone whose passport is close to expiring.

Make two photocopies of all your travel documents in case of emergency or if your documents are lost or stolen. Leave one copy with a friend or relative at home. It is always a great idea to let at least one person know exactly where you will be staying and how to contact you in an emergency. Carry the other copy with you stored separately from the originals. Documents to make copies of include: Passport ID page Foreign visa (if applicable) Itinerary Hotel confirmation Airline ticket Driver’s license Credit cards brought on the trip Traveler’s check serial numbers

For information on how to apply for a United States passport, visit http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/passports.html

Travel Alerts and Warnings for Your Destination

The Department of State urges U.S. citizens living overseas or planning to travel abroad to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). When you enroll in STEP, we can update you with important safety and security announcements. Enrolling will also make it easier for the embassy or consulate to contact you in the event of an emergency. You should remember to keep all of your information in STEP up to date; it is particularly important when you enroll or update your information to include a current phone number and e­mail address.

Are You Prepared for an Emergency?

The Department of State urges U.S. citizens living overseas or planning to travel abroad to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). When you enroll in STEP, we can update you with important safety and security announcements. Enrolling will also make it easier for the embassy or consulate to contact you in the event of an emergency. You should remember to keep all of your information in STEP up to date; it is particularly important when you enroll or update your information to include a current phone number and e­mail address.

Learn about local laws and customs

While traveling, you are subject to the local laws even if you are a U.S. Citizen. Foreign laws and legal systems can be vastly different from our own and it is very important to know what’s legal and what’s not. If you break local laws while abroad, your U.S. passport won’t help you avoid arrest or prosecution, and the U.S. Embassy cannot get you out of jail.

Do You Need Any New Vaccinations?

Some countries require foreign visitors to carry an International Certificate of Vaccination (aka Yellow Card) or other proof that they have had certain inoculations or medical tests before entering or transiting their country. Before you travel, check the Country Specific Information and contact the foreign embassy of the country to be visited or transited through for currently entry requirements. Health Experts Recommend Vaccinations for Travel to Some Countries The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) can provide you their recommendations for vaccinations and other travel health precautions for your trip abroad.

Does Your Health Insurance Cover You Outside the U.S.?

Learn what medical services your health insurance provider will cover overseas. Although some health insurance companies will pay “customary and reasonable” hospital costs abroad, very few will pay for a medical evacuation back to the United States, which can easily cost up to $100,000, or even more, depending on your condition and location. Regardless of whether your insurance is valid overseas, you may be required to pay for care when you receive it. If your insurance policy does not cover you abroad, consider purchasing a short ­term policy that does. Many travel agents and private companies offer insurance plans that will cover health care expenses incurred overseas including emergency services such as medical evacuations.

NOTE: Social Security and Medicare do not provide coverage outside of the U.S.     Learn More

Prescriptions And Other Medications

If you take prescription medication:

  • Pack enough to last your entire trip, including some extra in case you are unexpectedly delayed.
  • Carry your medications in their original labeled containers, and pack them in your carry-on bag since checked baggage is occasionally lost or delayed.
  • Ask your pharmacy or physician for the generic equivalent name of your prescriptions in case you need to purchase additional medication abroad.
  • Get a letter from your physician in case you are questioned about  your carry-on medication; some countries have strict restrictions on bringing prescription or even non-prescription medications into the country without proper medical documentation.